Poisons & Plants to Avoid


Foods to avoid

Reasons to avoid

Alcoholic beverages

Can cause intoxication, coma, and death.

Baby food

Can contain onion powder, which can be toxic to dogs. (Please see onion below.) Can also result in nutritional deficiencies, if fed in large amounts.

Bones from fish, Cooked bones from poultry, or other meat sources

Can cause obstruction or laceration of the digestive system.

Cat food

Generally too high in protein and fats.

Chocolate, coffee, tea, and other caffeine

Contain caffeine, theobromine, or theophylline, which can be toxic and affect the heart and nervous systems

Citrus oil extracts

Can cause vomiting.

Fat trimmings

Can cause pancreatitis.

Grapes and raisins

Contain an unknown toxin, which can damage the kidneys.

Hops

Unknown compound causes panting, increased heart rate, elevated temperature, seizures, and death.

Human vitamin supplements containing iron

Can damage the lining of the digestive system and be toxic to the other organs including the liver and kidneys.

Large amounts of liver

Can cause Vitamin A toxicity, which affects muscles and bones.

Macadamia nuts

Contain an unknown toxin, which can affect the digestive and nervous systems and muscle.

Marijuana

Can depress the nervous system, cause vomiting, and changes in the heart rate.

Milk and other dairy products

Some adult dogs and cats do not have sufficient amounts of the enzyme lactase, which breaks down the lactose in milk. This can result in diarrhea. Lactose-free milk products are available for pets.

Mouldy or spoiled food, garbage

Can contain multiple toxins causing vomiting and diarrhea and can also affect other organs.

Mushrooms

Can contain toxins, which may affect multiple systems in the body, cause shock, and result in death.

Onions  (raw, cooked, or powder)

Contain sulfoxides and disulfides, which can damage red blood cells and cause anemia. Cats are more susceptible than dogs. 

Persimmons

Seeds can cause intestinal obstruction and enteritis.

Pits from peaches and plums

Can cause obstruction of the digestive tract.

Potato, rhubarb, and tomato leaves; potato and tomato stems

Contain oxalates, which can affect the digestive, nervous, and urinary systems. This is more of a problem in livestock.

Raw egg yolks

Contain an enzyme called avidin, which decreases the absorption of biotin (a B vitamin). This can lead to skin and hair coat problems. Raw eggs may also contain Salmonella.

Raw fish

Can result in a thiamine (a B vitamin) deficiency leading to loss of appetite, seizures, and in severe cases, death. More common if raw fish is fed regularly.

Salt

If eaten in large quantities it may lead to electrolyte imbalances.

String

Can become trapped in the digestive system; called a "string foreign body."

Sugary foods

Can lead to obesity, dental problems, and possibly diabetes mellitus.

Table scraps (in large amounts)

Table scraps are not nutritionally balanced. They should never be more than 10% of the diet. Fat should be trimmed from meat; bones should not be fed.

Tobacco

Contains nicotine, which affects the digestive and nervous systems. Can result in rapid heart beat, collapse, coma, and death.

Yeast dough

Can expand and produce gas in the digestive system, causing pain and possible rupture of the stomach or intestines.

 

 

Plants to avoid

 

 

Aloe Vera
Amaryllis
Apple (seeds)
Apricot (pit)
Arrowhead
Asparagus Fern
Avocado
Autumn Crocus
Azalea

Baneberry
Begonia
Bird of Paradise
Black Locust
Black Walnut
Bleeding Heart
Boston Ivy

Caladium
California Poppy
Calla Lily
Carnation
Castor Bean
Ceriman
Cherry (seeds, wilting leaves, and pit)
Chinese Evergreen
Chives
Christmas Rose
Chrysanthemum
Clematis
Corn Plant
Crocus
Croton
Crown of Thorns
Crown Vetch
Cyclamen

Daffodil
Delphinium
Devil's Ivy
Dicentra
Dieffenbachia
Donkey Tail
Dumb Cane
Dutchman's Breeches

Easter Lily
Elderberry
Elephant Ears
English Ivy
Eucalyptus

Fiddle-leaf Fig
Florida Beauty
Four O'Clock
Foxglove
Foxtail
Fruit Salad Plant

German Ivy
Gladiola

Hemlock
Holly
Honeysuckle
Hurricane Plant
Hyacinth
Hydrangea

Iris
Ivy

Jack in the Pulpit
Japanese Yew
Jerusalem Cherry
Jimson Weed
Jonquil

Kalanchoe

Lamb's quarter
Lantana
Larkspur
Laurel
Lily
Lily of the Valley
Lobelia
Locoweed
Lords-and-Ladies
Lupine

Marigold (Marsh Marigold)
Marijuana
Mayapple
Mexican Breadfruit
Milkweed
Mistletoe
Monkshood
Morning Glory
Mother-in-Law plant
Mother-in-Law's Tongue
Mountain Laurel
Mushrooms

Narcissus
Nephthytis
Nightshade

Oak Tree (buds and acorns)
Oleander
Onion

Peace Lily
Peach (wilting leaves and pits)
Pencil Tree
Philodendron
Pigweed
Poinsettia
Poison Ivy
Poison Hemlock
Poison Oak
Poison Sumac
Poppy
Potato (all green parts)
Pothos
Precatory Bean

Rhododendron
Rhubarb
Ribbon Cactus
Rubber Tree

Sago Palm
Schefflera
Shamrock Plant
Snake Plant
Snow on the Mountain
Sorghum
Star of Bethlehem
Stinging Nettle
Stinkweed
Swiss Cheese Plant

Taro Vine
Toadstools
Tobacco
Tomato Plant (entire plant except ripe fruit)

Umbrella Tree

Water Hemlock
Weeping Fig
Wisteria

Yew

 

 

 

Drugs to avoid

Source

Toxic Dose - call vet!!

Acetaminophen

Tylenol, Allerest, Anacin-3, Comtrex, Dayquil, Nyquil, SineAid, SineOff, Vanquish, and numerous other products that contain acetaminophen.

Dogs: 45 mg per pound of body weight.
Cats: 22 mg per pound of body weight.

Amphetamine

Amphetamines are illegal drugs also known as speed or uppers. Other drug agents in this class include methamphetamines, phenmetrazine, and mephentermine. There are some legal uses for amphetamines in human medicine.

Death has been noted with the ingestion of 0.59 mg of methamphetamine per pound of body weight.

Antihistamines &
Decongestants

Diphenhydramine, (Benadryl, Sominex, Nytol, Sleep-Eze, various cough preparations), clemastine (Tavist), brompheniramine and chlorpheniramine (Chlor-Trimeton and various cough preparations), dimenhydrinate (Dramamine), meclizine (Bonine), cyclizine (Marezine), terfenadine (Seldane), hydroxyzine (Atarax, Vistaril), and loratidine (Claritin).

Varies depending upon the product.

Aspirin

Aspirin, Pepto-Bismol, and many other pain and fever medications.

Dogs: 22 mg per pound per day.
Cats: 11 mg per pound per day, may see symptoms after one dose.

Cocaine

Pets may gain exposure by eating bags of cocaine, sniffing the drug, or ingesting or licking drug paraphenalia such as used facial tissues.

Varies depending on type and concentration.

Iron

Nutritional supplements such as vitamin-mineral preparations with iron, injections of iron, and plant fertilizer

Varies depending on source and route of exposure.

Marijuana

Hashish, marijuana, and hemp, Cannabis.

Depends on the concentration of THC and the form of marijuana ingested.

Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs)

Many analgesics, fever medications, and anti-inflammatory medications such as ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil, Nuprin, Vick's DayQuil), indomethacin, piroxicam (Feldene), phenylbutazone (Bute and Butazolidin), and naproxen (Naprosyn and Aleve). Veterinary NSAIDs include products such as Aspirin, carprofen (Rimadyl), ketoprofen, and etodolac (EtoGesic).

Varies with each medication and species. Example: Ibuprofen is toxic at 22-50 mg per pound of body weight.

Sodium Phosphate Enemas

Fleet enemas

Over 25 pounds of body weight - 4 fl. oz
Less than 25 pounds of body weight - 2 fl. oz.

Tricyclic Antidepressants

Medications such as imipramine, desimipramine, trimipramine, amitriptyline, and doxepin. Trade names include Asendin, Elavil, Endep, Etrafon, Limbitrol, Ludiomil, Norpramin, Pamelor, Sinequan, Tofranil, Triavil, and Vivactil.

Varies depending upon the specific TCA.

Zinc

Pennies made since 1982, zinc oxide skin preparations such as Desitin, and galvanized metal such as nails and staples. Other sources include calamine lotion, suppositories, shampoos, zinc undecylenate (Desenex), sunblock containing zinc oxide, fertilizers, and paint

Varies depending on form of zinc and time period of exposure

Reprinted with permission of Wendy Wheat, Rhumderry Havanese.



Contact Details
Ron and Joan Harrison
Bunyip, VIC, Australia
Phone : 0429550605
Email : [email protected]

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